What, Change?

what-change-blogThough some in recovery might practice “old behavior” for a while, patterns and consequences of the past return until they find their capacity to change. Those who help others recover can forget that they too are vulnerable to the complexities and subtleties of this disease. The media is full of practitioners of recovery caught in contradictory behavior. The pursuit of pleasure and relief of discomfort may have come in the form of money, power, property, prestige or sex, temporarily substituting for the drink and drug.

The means to recover from alcoholism and addiction may be varied; the capacity to change needs consistency. Any time we place a person, place or object over our overriding desire for and ability to change, we become entangled and bound. What we want is freedom from discomfort and pain, and the experience of pleasure. When we use others to get “our fix” of money, power, property, prestige or sex, this is “old behavior”. Rather than using drugs or alcohol, we use people, places and things.

To break the habits and patterns of alcoholism and addiction, people talk a lot about “recovery”. What is “recovery” if not “change”? Rather being stuck in old behavior, we begin to choose new directions and routes to pleasure and relief. We become concerned in longer term goals and solutions, and we care about others. Recovery includes the ability to change attitude, direction, behavior, perception, habits, goals, motivators, etc. In recovery, we not only change in the moment, but we build “resilience”- a capacity to change over time.

The irony about choice and change is that it usually comes from “willingness” rather than “willfulness”. Change is acquired and learned. If we could access and then manage what we need and desire, change may be less urgent. A problem with alcoholism and addiction stems from the inability to manage and control the object of desire. Sober solutions need to be learned and the alcoholic addict needs to become teachable.

When the student is ready, the teacher will appear. Readiness for change can be described and aided. To encourage change, the teacher or counselor must be trustworthy, respectful and must collaborate with the person needing help. A teacher or counselor’s coercive, disrespectful or deceptive behavior will obstruct change.

It’s now time for change and recovery.

Twin Town Treatment Centers is immediately accessible to all Los Angeles and Orange County residents, is accredited by The Joint Commission, and is certified by the California DHCS. All network HMO/PPO/EPO insurance plans and Medi-Cal contract with Twin Town Treatment Centers to provide drug and alcohol rehabilitation. Our phone is answered by real people. We see people on the same they you call. (866) 594-8844

 

Traveling or Recovering- A Geographic Cure?

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There exist many reasons why some people think that drug rehab requires travel, time away from home, at a significant financial burden.

Most reasons involve money for the residential rehab and a belief in geographic cures.

Much more revenue is created in the drug rehab industry when twenty-four-hour room, board and care are provided whether they are medically indicated or not. If you were to look for published evidence that a substance use disorder requires lengthy inpatient stays to create positive outcomes, you would need to overlook the body of research which sites favorable outcomes for outpatient treatment over the costly residential option.

Desperate families are vulnerable to telephone call-center tactics playing on their worst fears and desires for a cure. If the solution takes the problem elsewhere, that is even better. “Return my family member when they are fixed …”

No matter where I travel, there I am. The problem seems to follow me.

Leaving the chaos and wreckage created through addiction temporarily diminishes their impact… things seem better for a while. Then the wreckage catches up. Finally, you turn around and face it.

Outpatient treatment provides sober support and professional guidance while you face the wreckage of alcoholism and addiction- a time it’s most needed. Problems often pile higher, especially financial obligations, while away at a residential treatment center. Returning is more difficult and treatment support is often left behind. Relapse upon returning home after residential treatment is not uncommon.

Managing alcoholism and addiction… “taking a trip, not taking a trip” … “checking into health farms and sanitariums”.

Attempts at minimizing the impact of alcoholism and addiction are as old as mankind. Whether attempting to manage alcohol and drug intake or traveling across county “for the cure”, we often use unwise and sometime desperate measures to resolve addictive behaviors and consequences… which must eventually be resolved at home, with loved ones.

Have you ever taken a call from frightened small-town, youth stuck in Orange County or Los Angeles after being booted from a drug rehab, alcohol treatment center or residential treatment?

Where ever these kids find themselves stranded… Sherman Oaks, Hollywood, Torrance, Long Beach, Anaheim or Laguna Beach are scary places to find yourself deserted, especially if you’re from Small Town America.

If the residential treatment center doesn’t get paid, if the insurance company finds inadequate medical necessity to pay for residential treatment, or if the kid fowls up and gets booted, these kids find themselves on the street in unfamiliar and dangerous territory.

Outpatient treatment is effective, covered by MediCal and HMO insurance, and helps integrate recovery organically at home.

For people returning home from residential treatment, alcohol treatment center or drug rehab, outpatient treatment aids with translating their inpatient gains into real life. The support of the outpatient treatment staff and peer group provide an initial support network to face alcoholic/ addict wreckage, damaged relationships and challenges of making a living sober.

Twin Town Treatment Centers is immediately accessible to all Los Angeles and Orange County residents, is accredited by The Joint Commission, and is certified by the California DHCS. All network HMO/PPO/EPO insurance plans and Medi-Cal contract with Twin Town Treatment Centers to provide drug and alcohol rehabilitation. Our phone is answered by real people. We see people on the same they you call. (866) 594-8844

Can You Trust Treatment?

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Why is trusting addiction treatment providers a concern?

The practice of business and personal ethics is essential when providing treatment for addiction. When patients become commodities to be traded and paid for on the open market like cattle at an auction, how far does that message permeate the entire treatment milieu? When a referral sources/ interventionists are given exorbitant gifts or are secretly paid extraordinary fees for presentations, consultations or the like, how far away from the cattle auction have you strayed?

What is required to establish trust?

Treatment should be based on the elemental principal of effective therapy: TRUST. Building trust requires that our actions are consistently trustworthy. Respecting the people who ask us for help includes recommending services which are accessible, affordable and appropriate to their needs. Call centers and referral fees diminish patient identity and places patient need below financial incentive.

How do you find a trustworthy addiction treatment program?

In-network treatment providers are held accountable to Joint Commission standards and insurance contractual conditions. “Out-of-network” providers are not accountable for unnecessary or costly charges. How many times have we heard about a family being misled about the costs of treatment after the provider of treatment posted that they accept insurance? What the provider accepted was out-of-network revenues which are much less than the cost of treatment. The patient ends up paying a significantly higher bill having been led to believe that the insurance company should have covered more.

What should you expect in writing to establish a sense of trust?

Pre-admission informed consent provides patients and their families the costs, the benefits and the risks of engaging in a treatment program. Building trust from honest and transparent conversations, Twin Town staff inform treatment candidates about what they can expect. These realistic expectations become the basis from which a therapeutic relationship can develop. If patients and their families are misled or feel defrauded, no relationship is possible.

What can happen when a treatment provider is found not to be trustworthy?

How many families receive bad news twice when their loved one checks out of treatment early, and when the provider refused refund the unused portion of what was paid toward that treatment?

If a laboratory invites you to share in the proceeds for medically unnecessary and absurdly priced urinalysis testing schemes, do you excuse insurance abuse as “scholarships” for charity or “investments” of a business nature? How long will access to out-of-network PPO benefits survive under this type of abuse? Have you earned the trust of the patient, their family and the purchaser of care?

How does the addiction treatment program benefit by maintaining trustworthy standards?

Doing the right thing is not easy but it is what sobriety, recovery AND TREATMENT should be all about.

Twin Town encourages all providers to set and publish ethical standards on their website. Setting ethical standards helps establish public expectations while distinguishing the responsible provider from fraud.

What distinguishes trustworthy addiction treatment from those which are not trustworthy:

  • Refusing to accept/ pay referral fees or contract with referral mills (internet websites) to increase rates of patient enrollment. The patient and family geographic location, and the clinical needs expressed by the patient and their family are always considered when forming disposition/ referral plans.
  • Refusing to mislead patients and their families with statements such as, “We’ll take your insurance and we will accept payment arrangements for the unpaid balance”. In situations where the patient and their family are misled at enrollment, they are later shocked by bills which may exceed tens of thousands of dollars. The reality all along was that the insurance would have only paid for only a few days of residential or out-of-network treatment.
  • Refusing to contract with the patient or family for a “flat case-rate” for the entire course of treatment. Under flat case rate agreements refunds are frequently refused and the unused funds are pocketed.

What guides the standards of trustworthy addiction treatment programs?

Set ethical standards, integrate them into your “brand” and publish them on your website. Twin Town Treatment Centers publishes the following www.twintowntreatmentcenters.com:

  • Provide only cost-effective treatment which is quality monitored.
  • Before admission, provide full financial and service disclosure, and secure voluntary informed consent. Avoid surprises.
  • Seek to protect the dignity and confidentiality of each client patient and their family members.
  • Document and provide the treatment that is billed.
  • Respect and protect clinical relationships with current and/or prior caregivers.
  • Avoid transferring clients from care of therapists, counselors, psychiatrists and/or physicians. COORDINATE care with community professionals rather than setting up competitive or fragmented systems of care.

Twin Town Treatment Centers is immediately accessible to all Los Angeles and Orange County residents, is accredited by The Joint Commission, and is certified by the California DHCS. All network HMO/PPO/EPO insurance plans and Medi-Cal contract with Twin Town Treatment Centers to provide drug and alcohol rehabilitation. Our phone is answered by real people. We can see people on the same day you call. (866) 594-8844

Being “Right” in Sobriety

being-right-in-sobrietyIn sobriety, is it important to find the “right” recovery program or “correct” addiction treatment? Isn’t it essential to find the “right” way of thinking and feeling?

There exist many paths to recovery from addiction. What is most important is that a recovery program is immediately accessible, that it is constantly available and requires daily practice, and that it replaces behaviors which lead to or result from addiction.

Find a program which is free or affordable and which takes recovery into your daily life.

Practice the program everywhere you go. Addiction and its triggers will continue to follow you and you need to build new defenses and solutions.

Replace the words “right” and “correct” with “useful” and “productive”. Striving to be “correct” or “right” will take you back to your addiction. We form mental “committees” to debate and prove our righteousness. Obsessions start to cloud our consciousness and “being right” becomes self-destructive.

After so many years of research, why are there so many different treatment programs and approaches to recovery for addiction?

Many motives, both benevolent and self-serving drive research and the design of treatment programs for recovery.

The higher the cost or the greater the financial investment over time, the more important it is to research its mission and intension of the addiction treatment program.

Addiction is perhaps the most multifaceted disease which requires scientific research from medicine, sociology and psychology, also needing insights and guidance from spiritual, philosophical and humanistic schools. The result is a diverse set of approaches and programs for addiction recovery.

From large bodies of research, the most effective addiction treatment is provided by a trusted and respectful person who provides structure and direction over an extended period. The methodology of treatment is less important than type of relationships developed in a program of recovery.

Why do so many sober people insist that it is so important to give up self-reliance and personal initiative to find a recovery program from addiction?

Through our process of addiction, secrecy and dishonesty have become necessary defenses which have destroyed our ability to trust others. It is this trust that researchers have found as the essential ingredient for treating alcoholism and addiction.

Significant neurological and cognitive impairments result from alcoholism and addiction. Using this broken machinery to solve an all-encompassing problem is impossible. People engaging in a recovery program must accept different direction, take in new information and stop being “right”.

“Being right” implies that new directions or information are not needed. The alcoholic and addict present a desperate need for different solutions.

The belief that we cannot recover from addiction through our own knowledge and direction seems self-defeating and weak.

We become self-defeating and weak when we repeatedly try failing solutions and behavior, expecting different results. Using alcohol and drugs to relieve discomfort or to gain pleasure become futile exercises toward the later stages of alcoholism and addiction.

Attempting to practice new behavior without the assistance of others and the support of a sober support network is also often futile. In recovery, people learn from each other and replace the relief and pleasure of the chemical with that of being a friend.

How could someone else know what I need to get sober anyway? Why should I listen to what others say? I’m unique!

Terminal uniqueness is a great defense against change. People who have limited their solutions and resources to drugs and alcohol desperately need outside information, advise, direction and support.

People gaining sobriety are unique as are people who have successfully engaged in recovery. That difference can be shared along with the commonality with our struggles with drugs and alcohol. Our feelings are often common.

The story may sound different but the loneliness, fear, hopelessness and desperation are shared.

 Why is “being correct” dangerous to a personal recovery program?

To maintain sobriety and engage in long-term recovery, we must remain “teachable”. Being right or correct often closes us off from very helpful teachers and new ways of understanding and solving our problems.

Our old behaviors and solutions no longer work in recovery.

What is humility and why do people think that it’s so important for recovering from an addiction?

 “Humility” allows sober people to remain “teachable”. Consider “humility” as finding where we fit in a sober support network and how we accept help and new solutions.

What does “self-righteous indignation” mean anyway?

“Self-righteous indignation” is that annoying characteristic that some people practice helping them feel better about themselves or convince themselves that their work is over… they have achieved righteousness.

“Self-righteous indignation” isolates people and creates resentment and loneliness. In sobriety we find that being open to new information and solutions, and reducing the friction we create between ourselves and others is essential.

Twin Town Treatment Centers is immediately accessible to all Los Angeles and Orange County residents, is accredited by The Joint Commission, and is certified by the California DHCS. All network HMO/PPO/EPO insurance plans and Medi-Cal contract with Twin Town Treatment Centers to provide drug and alcohol rehabilitation. Our phone is answered by real people. We can see people on the same day you call. (866) 594-8844

Drugged Buzzed Driving Surpasses Drunk Driving

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Drug-impaired driving is more complex than alcohol-impaired driving for many reasons:

  • Hundreds of different drugs can impair drivers.
  • Some drugs that can impair driving are illegal to use, some are legal to use under certain conditions, and some are freely available over-the-counter.
  • For many drugs the relations between a drug’s presence in the body, its effect on driving, and its effects on crash risk are complex, not understood well, and vary from driver to driver.
  • It’s more difficult for law enforcement to detect drug impairment at the roadside than alcohol impairment.
  • It’s more difficult to prosecute and convict a driver for DUID than for alcohol-impaired driving (DUI).

Drug-impaired driving is an increasingly critical issue for states and state highway safety offices. In 2015, the most recent year for which data are available, NHTSA’s Fatality Analysis Reporting System (FARS) reported that drugs were present in 43% of the fatally-injured drivers with a known test result, more frequently than alcohol was present (FARS, 2016). NHTSA’s 2013–2014 roadside survey found drugs in 22% of all drivers both on weekend nights and on weekday days (Berning et al., 2015). In particular, marijuana use is increasing. … Congress identified drug-impaired driving as a priority in the Fixing America’s Surface Transportation (FAST) Act of 2015 (https://www.fhwa.dot.gov/fastact/).

In 2015, at least one instance of 80 of these drugs was reported by states for fatally- injured drivers, together with other drugs not in the FARS list (FARS, 2016). The DRUID (Driving under the Influence of Drugs, Alcohol and Medicines) project, the extensive 19-nation European study of drugs and driving, lists 22 drugs and alcohol as the most common in European drivers (Schulze, 2012). A single drug can have different names and can take different chemical forms. For example, marijuana is the substance that’s smoked or swallowed while its principal psychoactive component is tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), or more precisely its main isomer Δ9-THC. FARS has separate codes for marijuana, THC, Δ9-THC, and Unknown Cannabinoid.

HOW FREQUENTLY ARE DRUGS PRESENT IN DRIVERS?

The best data come from fatal crashes because drivers in fatal crashes, especially fatally-injured drivers, are tested for drugs more frequently than drivers in non-fatal crashes. In 2015 nationwide, in the FARS annual report file, 57.0% of the fatally-injured drivers were tested for drugs. Of those tested, no drugs were detected in 55.4%, a drug in the FARS list was found in 34.3%, some other drug in 7.4%, and test results were unknown for 2.9%. Over one-third – 36.5% – of the identified drugs were marijuana in some form, followed by amphetamine at 9.3% (FARS, 2016).

Alcohol was present at somewhat lower levels. In the 2015 annual report file, 70.9% of the fatally-injured drivers were tested for alcohol. No alcohol was detected in 60.9% of those tested, alcohol at a positive BAC in 37.3%, and test results were unknown for 1.8%.

Fatally-injured drivers in Canada had similar drug and alcohol levels. In 2010, 34.2% were positive for drugs and 39.1% for alcohol, with marijuana present in 36.9% of the drug-positive drivers (Beirness, 2014b). In 2012, 39.2% were positive for drugs (Robertson et al., 2017).

Only 19.0% of surviving drivers were tested for drugs in 2015. They had somewhat lower drug levels: no drugs in 59.9% of those tested, a drug in the FARS list in 26.5%, some other drug in 4.8%, and unknown test results for 8.9%. For surviving drivers, 46.5% of the identified drugs were marijuana. Alcohol was tested in 28.4% of the surviving drivers in 2015. No alcohol was detected in 72.2%, alcohol at a positive BAC in 23.6%, and test results were unknown for 4.2%.

http://www.ghsa.org/resources/drugged-driving-2017

http://www.ghsa.org/sites/default/files/2017-04/GHSA_DruggedDriving2017_FINAL.pdf

Twin Town Treatment Centers is immediately accessible to all Los Angeles and Orange County residents, is accredited by The Joint Commission, and is certified by the California DHCS. All network HMO/PPO/EPO insurance plans and Medi-Cal contract with Twin Town Treatment Centers to provide drug and alcohol rehabilitation. Our phone is answered by real people. We can see people on the same day you call. (866) 594-8844

Alcoholism and Drug Addiction Treatment and Rehab at Home

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People who have become alcoholic or addicted to drugs are familiar with using temporary solutions to fix their mounting and long-lasting problems. External remedies are sought to solve internal matters. “Take a pill”, “move”, “change partners”, “quit a job”, “celebrate”, “try more exercise” “listen to someone’s inspiration”- they work for a while until you catch up to where you left off.

Families with troubled youth often want to send them out for repair. A new changed person is expected after a couple of months in a residential treatment or rehab center.

People accustomed to taking a drink, a pill, a line, a bump, a hit, a snort, a shot to make things better attempt to fix the troubles with easy solutions. Problems which keep knocking on the door are changed by changing door. “Move to another city” … that will solve the trouble for a while until you find yourself there, again.

Recovering alcoholics and addicts label moving to avoid problems, “taking a geographic”. It is avoidance of responsibility and magical thinking. The problem remains through space.

Wherever you go, you eventually find yourself… you take your problems wherever you go. Treatment and rehab should not be another “geographic” escape from the problems and the consequences of a life that has become unmanageable. Facing the wreckage, triggers, and problem behavior at home is required if a solution is to be found.

Addiction, including alcoholism is characterized by many signs and symptoms. A distinguishing symptom is when the addict or alcoholic continues their use in the face of its negative consequences. (“Crazy” is when you take the same action but expect different results.)

Recovery starts with avoiding the first drink or drug… abstaining from addictive substances one day at a time. That beginning may be inside a safe and supportive rehab or treatment center, or the beginning could be at home with the direction, instruction and support of an intensive outpatient program. The practices of recovery must be established at home in the long term… postponing may feel comfortable but may be unnecessary.

Intensive outpatient treatment provides an “at home” process of learning, understanding, becoming increasingly aware, practicing new skills, and monitoring personal ideas, feelings and behaviors. In intensive outpatient treatment, people discover at home, with loved ones and at work, with coworker a new way of acting. An openness to learn and understand new ideas, and to practice new behaviors and skills is developed naturally, where it is needed the most. An outpatient support group and professional helps find new ways of facing triggers, people, places and things which were once part of the addictive lifestyle.

New friends and acquaintances who understand and support sobriety are gained, and can be maintained over the long-term in outpatient treatment. Leaving outpatient treatment or rehab doesn’t mean losing all the supportive relationships and practices that may be fragmented when leaving a residential program.

Intensive outpatient treatment can be as or more effective than residential treatment as demonstrated by research. It is also much more affordable and accessible, especially if insurance coverage is to cover the costs of treatment.

Twin Town Treatment Centers is immediately accessible to all Los Angeles and Orange County residents, is accredited by The Joint Commission, and is certified by the California DHCS. All network HMO/PPO/EPO insurance plans and Medi-Cal contract with Twin Town Treatment Centers to provide drug and alcohol rehabilitation. Our phone is answered by real people. We can see people on the same day you call. (866) 594-8844

What Does It Take to Get Clean and Sober?

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A: Getting sober entails changing ideas, choices and behaviors. The first step toward recovery is a recognition that change is better than continuing the condition and direction you find yourself. To recognize that change is desired, you need to be open to new ideas.

Often, we defend ourselves in the face of actual or imagined challenges. If you defend your current condition and excuse away the difficulties you are encountering, you fight to remain the same. If instead you listen to other ideas and consider how they could apply to you, change may be possible.

Consider other feedback as an “invitation” to try something new rather than a demand toward which you will rebel.

Q: Does getting sober require accepting help from others?

A: If you can stop the behavior which is harming you and your loved ones and make long-lasting changes, seeking help may be secondary. If you have difficulty maintaining a new direction which produces better results for yourself and others, help is necessary.

People addicted to alcohol and drugs can sometimes cease drinking and using without help. Many times, other problematic feelings and behaviors arise because of their unassisted abstinence. Recovery can be enjoyable and rewarding if help is accepted. New supportive relationships can replace the void left by the drugs and alcohol. Cravings can be overcome by better coping and communication skills. That dreadful loneliness is replaced by connecting with others.

Q: How do I quit for good and never relapse on drugs or alcohol?

A: When making such a significant change as sobering up and engaging in a program of recovery, it is vital to take it slowly and not to overwhelm yourself. Eventually you will discover that the only thing you changed was everything. This amount of change doesn’t happen quickly and it never stops.

One Day at a Time
Take Only the Next Indicated Step
Life is Not a Race
Take it Easy
One Step at a Time

Q: Does recovery require moving into a treatment center and paying a lot of money for treatment?

A: No. When medical or behavioral risks of withdrawal or relapse require external monitoring and control, a brief inpatient stay may be recommended. Getting sober and engaging in recovery may require professional guidance and support but treatment doesn’t need to be expensive and often doesn’t require an inpatient or residential setting to provide it.

The changes made in recovery need to be made in your day to day life. If you don’t practice recovery at home with your loved ones and friends, it won’t last. Outpatient treatment can provide that guided practice while you live at home and participate in your personal activities and relationships.

Q: What are other essential ingredients toward achieving lasting recovery?

A: H.O.W.

Honesty
Openness
Willingness

Twin Town Treatment Centers is immediately accessible to all Los Angeles and Orange County residents, is accredited by The Joint Commission, and is certified by the California DHCS. All network HMO/PPO/EPO insurance plans and Medi-Cal contract with Twin Town Treatment Centers to provide drug and alcohol rehabilitation. Our phone is answered by real people. We can see people on the same day you call. (866) 594-8844

Want to Get Clean and Sober?

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A: Rather than chasing the first high, twenty years later, becoming clean and sober provides something else to do. Change is next to impossible during the time that your time is occupied with “getting-by” and making it through until the next drink or hit or toke. When your priorities start with getting that feeling back or getting rid of the feelings that you have, little room is left for other activities.

Becoming bored, miserable, discouraged or afraid with the lifestyle of the alcohol and addict, many people decide that it’s time to clean up and sober up.

Q: How long does it take to clean up and sober up?

A: The change from alcoholic/ addict to clean and sober comes “one day at a time”. Don’t rush it. Enjoy the process like the experience of early spring to summer- each day presents new growth and new changes of weather. The rain nourishes the flowers and color enters a once gray world.

Q: What is the difference between abstinence and recovery?

A: Abstinence is NOT doing something. Recovery is doing MANY things.

Practice this exercise: Don’t think of white winged horses. What did you think about? Now, instead of thinking of white winged horsed, think about what is really in front of you right now. This is the difference between abstinence and recovery.

Q: Recovery is often described as a superior status for people with drug and alcohol problems. How is it different and what does it mean?

A: People with drug and alcohol problems often get stuck in a rut that they only make deeper. That rut is full of frustration, loneliness but is creating with ease: behaviors that are known and seem safe and require no thought are recited over and over. Addiction and alcoholism is easy and requires no thought.

Recovery requires waking up to reality, as unpleasant as it may be. Recovery requires new ideas, new behaviors and the honesty, humility and willingness to learn them. Recovery is not easy.

Q: What is so special about recovery anyway?

A: Remember the coldest winter you’ve encountered. The cold gray weather keeps you indoors and you can’t do anything except keep warm. One day you notice a warm spell. The next day the snow starts to melt. Eventually green sprigs of grass appear followed by buds on the trees. Eventually the world is a colorful garden full of flowers, birds and warmth!

Recovery connects and reconnects you with people who care for you and you care for them. Recovery allows you to awaken fresh with hope for a new day, each day. Recovery gives you new adventures which you enjoy.

Recovery restores your love of life and appreciation for things outside of yourself.

Recovery allows you to want what you have.

Q: How do people gain recovery?

A: Recovery can start today. There are many routes to recovery which include talking with your therapist or doctor, calling a mutual support organization such as AA, NA central office or SMART Recovery, or calling a trusted rehab program. Avoid internet searches and instead rely upon people who have gotten recovery or professionals who have directed people successfully to recovery.

Twin Town Treatment Centers is immediately accessible to all Los Angeles and Orange County residents, is accredited by The Joint Commission, and is certified by the California DHCS. All network HMO/PPO/EPO insurance plans and Medi-Cal contract with Twin Town Treatment Centers to provide drug and alcohol rehabilitation. Our phone is answered by real people. We can see people on the same day you call. (866) 594-8844

Why Care About Less Fortunate Drunks and Addicts and their chances at recovery?

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If there’s not a buck to be made, an investment to pursue, or a luxury to indulge, why should we worry about helping less fortunate drunks and addicts anyway? Treating well-insured or wealthy addicts and alcoholics is a great business. Mark-up charges for residential treatment, create rationale why it is justified and the businessman has done his good deed for himself and his investors. Convince the family and the insurance company that the cost and level of care is necessary, you have half the battle won.

What about those poor alcoholics and addicts who only have HMO, EPO, Medicaid/ MediCal or no coverage at all? Haven’t they earned their misery in the first place? Why should we throw good money after bad trying to help them?

“Legislation being marked up Wednesday would phase out Obamacare’s Medicaid expansion, which covers 1.2 million Americans with serious mental illness and substance abuse problems, as well as scrap baseline coverage requirements. The change means certain beneficiaries would no longer get coverage for mental health and substance abuse treatments guaranteed under the Affordable Care Act.”

These sentiments emerge in the face of the largest and most deadly drug epidemic in national history. The “arrest and lock them up” war-on-drugs has proven not only ineffective, but massively more expensive than treatment. The block-grant system created a system where people died or are dying in cue, waiting for some form of help.

One hallmark of addiction is “denial”- the tendency to avoid the realization that a problem and a solution exists. Another trait is prioritizing inanimate objects (drugs/ alcohol) and feelings over taking care of loved ones and community. Yet another trademark of addiction is practicing the same behavior expecting different results.

A record number of people are now getting some form of addiction treatment so isn’t obvious that we should end such benefits? Isn’t it more important that we place dollars back in the pockets of the wealthy so that we can return to a system which served few and will increasingly serve fewer?

As a society, we are here. This is the age of personality, property and prestige. The object, the relief and the pleasure is prized over human life.

By the grace of a higher power, there exist mutual help organizations and congregations dedicated to helping those in need for no other return than continued sobriety and serenity. Unfortunately, not everyone has the capacity or willingness to access recovery through such voluntary means. Many alcoholics and addicts need professional engagement, prompting, guidance and case-management to connect with a new sober life.

Call a local non-profit, religiously-affiliated hospital and find out how they can provide detoxification and/or treatment for a Medicaid/ MediCal or indigent patient. Search the internet for a treatment program which can start treating a Medicaid/ MediCal or indigent patient tomorrow.

Next time someone pats your back or their own back for the amazing work being done to get people sober, first consider primary motives.

Everyone has family, friend or acquaintance who has personal losses due to drug and alcohol addiction. Everyone sees who are the most difficult to treat every day. What will be our next priority?

Twin Town Treatment Centers is immediately accessible to all Los Angeles and Orange County residents, is accredited by The Joint Commission, and is certified by the California DHCS. All network HMO/PPO/EPO insurance plans and Medi-Cal contract with Twin Town Treatment Centers to provide drug and alcohol rehabilitation. Our phone is answered by real people. We can see people on the same day you call. (866) 594-8844

Why Do People Want to Get Clean and Sober?

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A: Much has been said about the downside of drug and alcohol use when they no longer provide pleasure or relieve discomfort. People go to varying lengths of despair and degradation before it occurs to them that it’s time to clean up. The pain, boredom and shame encountered from an addiction needs to be accompanied by hope that becoming clean and sober will improve life. With this direction toward something better, addicts and alcoholics have nowhere to turn.

Q: Giving up your primary method of accessing pleasure, avoiding discomfort and pain, and coping with life’s difficulties must be terrifying. What helps people overcome that fear?

A: When someone who has been through addiction and alcoholism, who is now in recovery shares their personal story, it provides a real-life example for someone caught in the downward spiral of addiction. Addiction treatment programs often employ people who have been there who now have experience, strength and hope to give to those in need.

Q: Does drug treatment promise sobriety and recovery?

A: No. Recovery requires willingness and some level of commitment. Changing levels of “readiness” and motivation are typical of people with drug and alcohol problems. It is easier to avoid and deny than to make real change, especially when you have practiced the same solution year after year, even when it no longer works.

Quitting is easy. Staying quit requires a program of recovery.

Q: What can drug treatment provide toward gaining recovery?

A: Mutual support groups offer an essential route to recovery, which includes social support, recovery practices, and a sense of purpose and direction. Participants must be willing and motivated to attend since no one is going to call if you don’t show up.

Recovery from addiction and alcoholism is a life-long process that is taken one day at a time.

Q: Why can’t alcoholics and addicts choose to use less and simply moderate their drinking and drug use?

A: When the brain has been changed by the overuse of drugs and alcohol, there comes a point where the capacity for choice is lost. A single drink or drug creates such craving for the next, moderating use is impossible. Neuropsychologists and brain researchers have discovered the physiology explaining how compulsion to use overrides decision-making and personal control.

Q: Other than stopping the negative consequences of addiction and alcoholism, what benefits do recovery bring?

A: A new life begins with the initiation of sobriety. Though difficult, recovery brings back the capacity to choose, the capacity to change and the capacity to take actions which will result in longer term rewards.

Postponing gratification is difficult during addiction.

Recovery brings back a sense of color and variation, where addiction becomes somewhat black and white.

Recovery restores priorities for connecting with people, participating in enjoyable activities, and for gaining self-esteem by practicing estimable acts.

Twin Town Treatment Centers is immediately accessible to all Los Angeles and Orange County residents, is accredited by The Joint Commission, and is certified by the California DHCS. All network HMO/PPO/EPO insurance plans and Medi-Cal contract with Twin Town Treatment Centers to provide drug and alcohol rehabilitation. Our phone is answered by real people. We can see people on the same day you call. (866) 594-8844